13 months - and still no cria!
Dam Rejects Cria
Disrespectful Llama
Late-Day Babies

If a llama is co-operative, trimming toenails is simple and easy. But most of us can claim at least one llama who'll stubbornly refuse to stand still and raise his foot when we ask him to do so. On these occasions that 'easy' job is put on the back burner.

Those toenails grow long and crooked, causing discomfort and sometimes even lameness in the llama.

There are various training methods to remedy the problem but often they involve more time than is available.

   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A simple and safe way to trim toenails is in a 'llama-chute' ... a confined area between solid walls, W1200mm x H1200mm x L1800mm.

Even in a catch pen (3m x 3m), some llamas won't let us touch their legs, let alone pick up feet.

On the other hand, in a chute they seem to be happy to let us do whatever is needed. It's almost as if they feel more secure in a confined area.

Our latest chute has walls which fold down in the centre to a height of 600mm and in this lower position the llama still seems uneasy but once the walls are raised (s)he relaxes.

Some llamas sit as soon as toenail trimming begins so this problem is solved by belly straps.

Should a llama require medical attention, a chute provides a safe working area for the owner, llama and vet.

Our first chute which was built of timber, cost less than $150 and worked well. Today there are a range of commercially produced chutes available.

13 months - and still no cria!
Dam Rejects Cria
Disrespectful Llama
Late-Day Babies

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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